Corvina Beach, Salton Sea California

Now that we are back in the land of fast internet, I thought It was time to play catch-up with some of our winter adventures.

Friends of ours, Mike & Geri recommended we camp at Corvina Beach in the Salton Sea State Park on our way to the Palm Springs area.

We have passed this place a few times on our travels west, but never stopped. As always, their recommendations were correct, very cool place to spend a few nights.

Since it’s a state park, we had to pay to camp……Still a great price for a great view.

Location: California Hwy 111

COST: $10/night or $8.00 for over age 62

Note: self registration, need cash

A little foggy, but we still enjoyed our morning coffee view!

You can park right along the sea

The beach of the Sea has increased with all the water loss over the years. From a distance, the beach just looks like ordinary sand, until you start getting closer to it.

This was not sand we were see, but a beach made barnacles and bones!

Barnacles and bits of bone

Part of a fish skeletons

I found it very neat to walk down to the water and investigate the beach, Myron on the other hand said ‘No way”!

Since we were on the North East shore, and it was still cool in January there was no smell of decay. I don’t think I would want to stay there when the temp were high!

If you don’t know the history of the Salton Sea you can click here.

We even got to watch a few of these pass by.

Since we were there for a few days, we decided to do a little tour and check out Dos Palmas Reserve not far from our camp.

Location: Dos Palmas Spring Rd, Mecca, CA 92254

A short hike in to see the Palms.

we are getting closer

This one was cut down, very neat trunk system.

The fruits these trees produce

No hike is complete without a selfie!

2 thoughts on “Corvina Beach, Salton Sea California

  1. You are right, Becky….you would not want to hang out here very long once it gets warmer. The smell is pretty bad once when we were there later in the year. The fish suffer from anoxia. Once the fish die, there is a feeding frenzy with the gulls. We have been very lucky over the years to see many white and black, and also the rarer brown pelicans, although their numbers are declining, sadly.

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